Dr Gabrielle Watson

Law
Postdoctoral Research Fellow; Leverhulme Early Career Fellow, Faculty of Law

Qualifications

LLB, MSc, DPhil

Academic background

Current - Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Christ Church, Oxford (from 2017)
Current - Leverhulme Early Career Fellow, Faculty of Law, University of Oxford (from 2017)
2012 to 2016 - Postgraduate, DPhil, Respect and Criminal Justice, University of Oxford
2011 to 2012 - Postgraduate, MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice with Distinction, University of Oxford
2007 to 2011 - Undergraduate, LLB with First Class Honours, University of Edinburgh

Undergraduate teaching

I offer undergraduate tutorials in criminology, criminal justice and jurisprudence at the University of Oxford.

Research Interests

I work on topics in criminal justice theory and practice. Funded by the Leverhulme Trust, I am currently pursuing a research project on ‘keywords’ and criminal justice. I am considering how institutionally-approved terms such as ‘courtesy’, ‘tolerance’, ‘fairness’, ‘decency’, ‘humanity’ and ‘respect’ – together with the legal values that these terms represent and reflect – shape the practice of policing and imprisonment. The project aims to offer a challenging corrective to current scholarship which, at best, gestures towards the significance of our linguistic choices for those we seek to police and punish.

Publications include:

• G Watson, The Literature on Older Prisoners. Report commissioned by Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Prisons for Scotland. Edinburgh: Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons for Scotland (2017).

• G Watson (with JV Roberts), ‘Reducing Female Admissions to Custody: Exploring the Options at Sentencing’ (2017) Criminology and Criminal Justice (published online ahead of print).

• G Watson, Review of D Garland, American Penal Power: Its Forms, Functions and Social Foundations. Centre for Criminology 50th Anniversary Lecture. Oxford: Centre for Criminology, Faculty of Law, University of Oxford (2016).

• G Watson, Review of MJ Coyle, Talking Criminal Justice: Language and the Just Society (2015) Theoretical Criminology 19(3) 445-448.